Medical City McKinney March 03, 2017

Medical City McKinney is pleased to announce five nurses have received recognition as one of DFW’s “The Great 100 Nurses” including Ann Dutze, Emergency Services Clinical Supervisor; Gary Huey, Texas Two Step Coordinator; Mark Lisonbee; Manager of Med/Surg; Mike Mixson, Manager of Trauma Services; and Cassidi Roberts, Chief Nursing Officer.

“The Great 100 Nurses” recognizes RNs for excellence in the art and science of nursing. Nurses were nominated by peers and selected because they are role models, leaders, community servants, compassionate caregivers and significant contributors ot the nursing profession. Honorees come from all practice areas in nursing, including acute care, sub-acute care, school nursing, nurse leaders, academics and more.

“Medical City McKinney has many outstanding nurses, and I am proud to see five of our nurse leaders selected for this prestigious honor. The Great 100 Nurses recognizes each of them for their individual contributions to the nursing field,” said Ernest C. Lynch, III, FACHE, Chief Executive Officer of Medical City McKinney.

Ann Dutze

Since joining Medical City McKinney in 2006, Dutze, a veteran nurse of 30 years, has held several emergency department positions including staff nurse, charge nurse and clinical supervisor.

Her team approach and her willingness to always go above and beyond contributes to the high standard of care in the emergency room.

“I am humbled by the responsibility that has been placed in my hands to care for a patient,” said Dutze. “I am proud to be a mentor to other nurses, help them grow their skills and to see them shine in the spotlight.”

Gary Huey

Huey joined Medical City Healthcare in 2004 as a PCU-Telemetry nurse and transitioned in 2011 to the Medical City Healthcare Texas Two Step Nursing Pathway program, an on-campus two-year program designed to allow current employees earn an associate’s degree in nursing through Collin College. More than 70 employees have graduated from this program. He is now pursuing a doctorate degree in education.

“I am proud to serve as a role model and educator for the future of nursing for HCA and the community,” Huey said. “The privilege to change the lives of those who live in our community, and work in our hospital is the greatest gift an educator can receive.”

Mark Lisonbee

Lisonbee’s nursing career has been focused on growing and developing new Medical-Surgical nurses. He joined the Medical City McKinney team in 2010 on the orthopedic unit, and was promoted to Medical-Surgical clinical supervisor in 2011 and Medical-Surgical Manager in 2015.

He leads others by providing meaningful coaching and mentoring to increase the capabilities of individuals and teams to accomplish organizational goals, drive employee engagement, increase patient satisfaction and optimize quality outcomes.

“I strive to help other nurses build their confidence and knowledge in this profession,” said Lisonbee. “I don’t take credit for their success, but rejoice in watching their skills and confidence grow.”

Mike Mixson

Mixson leads Medical City McKinney’s stroke and trauma programs, and spends countless hours educating nurses, physicians, and EMS providers on protocols and quality measures. He also educates local high school students on effects of drinking and driving through the Shattered Dreams program. He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in nursing, focusing on trauma, emergency services and hospital administration.

Outside of work, Mike serves as a volunteer firefighter, participates in medical mission trips and serves as an Anna Chamber of  Commerce board member.

“As a fourth generation nurse, being selected as a DFW Great 100 Nurse is a tremendous honor that I am truly grateful,” Mixson said.

Cassidi Roberts

Roberts is Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) and has been with  Medical City McKinney for more than 10 years.

She strongly believes her job is to mentor staff and to encourage them to complete advanced nursing degrees. She also promotes the “Walk In My Shoes” shadow program, to encourage staff to explore the hospital and learn what it is like to work in different departments, in different roles.

“The heart of a nurse expands gracefully through the number of meaningful encounters with their patients and families, and you find gratification in the thought that you made someone feel better or that you had a hand in extending a life,” Roberts said.